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The

Wellesley Centers for Women 

is a premier women- and gender-focused, social-change oriented research-and-action institute at Wellesley College.
Our mission is to advance gender equality, social justice, and human wellbeing through high quality research, theory, and action programs.

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A World That Is Good for Women Is Good for Everyone TM

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Wellesley Centers for Women

Wellesley Centers for Women connections grow in Washington, D.C.

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Research & Action Report, Fall/Winter 2013

Wellesley Centers for Women connections grow in Washington, D.C.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Q&A with Beatrice Achieng Nas, BSC: Nobody is a Nobody, Everybody is Somebody

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Research & Action Report, Fall/Winter 2013

Interview with Beatrice Achieng Nas, BSC

Beatrice Achieng Nas, the founder and director of a non-governmental organization in Uganda, is a Community Solutions Program Fellow through the International Research & Exchanges (IREX) Board and a Visiting Scholar at the Wellesley Centers for Women for the fall 2013 semester.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Commentary: Women, Employment, & Health

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Research & Action Report, Spring/Summer 2013

By Nancy Marshall, Ed.D.

When we think about employment and health, we often think about high risk jobs and occupational safety. The recent deaths of first responders in Massachusetts and Texas highlight these serious concerns. However, many workers are exposed to unhealthy conditions that, while not lethal, seriously affect their health.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Q&A with Nan Stein, Ed.D.: Educators can make a difference in preventing gender-based violence

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Research & Action Report, Spring/Summer 2013

Among Nan Stein’s contributions to the literature on sexual harassment and gender violence in schools are the first survey in the country on peer-to-peer sexual harassment in schools (1979-80); her book, Classrooms and Courtrooms: Facing Sexual Harassment in K-12 Schools; and three teaching guides1. Currently, she is working on the third stage of a study, Shifting Boundaries, which evaluates classroom lessons and school-wide interventions in middle schools intended to reduce sexual harassment and precursors to teen dating violence.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Open Circle: Celebrating 25 Years of Getting to the Heart of Learning

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Research & Action Report, Spring/Summer 2013

By Megan Kellett, B.A.

Open Circle, a program of the Wellesley Centers for Women (WCW), is celebrating its 25th Anniversary this year. A social and emotional learning (SEL) program for students in Kindergarten through Grade 5, Open Circle is dedicated to providing children with the skills they need to recognize and manage their emotions, establish positive relationships, make responsible decisions, develop care and concern for others, and handle challenging situations constructively.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Q&A with Jean Hardisty, Ph.D.: Women’s Lives and U.S. Public Policy— Where We Are Now

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Research & Action Report, Fall/Winter 2012

Interview by Susan Lowry Rardin

This is a fateful time for the United States. Two distinct visions for the country were pitted against each other in the recent elections. Clearly, women’s rights are still in question; civil rights are seen by some as irrelevant; and the federal budget deficit looms without a consensus as to its importance or how to fix it.

Public policy decisions, which often seem about war and the budget, are, in fact, always about women as well. Though we must focus on “women’s issues,” we must not lose sight of the importance for women of economic and military issues, Supreme Court and other judicial court appointments, and even environmental policies. As the Wellesley Centers for Women motto goes: “A world that is good for women is good for everyone.” - Jean Hardisty, Ph.D.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Commentary: Putting Children First -“Innocence” in Childhood & the Risk for Child Commercial Sexual Exp...

Research & Action Report, Fall/Winter 2012

By Kate Price, M.A.

As a society, we often seem to care more about protecting our cultural ideal of childhood innocence than about meeting the actual needs of real-life children—especially commercially sexually exploited children. To fit the ideal of purity, children require high levels of social capital—preferably, they’re white, middle or upper class, and heterosexual. They have limited or no sexual experience, enjoy secure health care, housing, and education, and they live within a supportive nuclear family. In my experience, children living without access to such resources are too often labeled “bad kids” and blamed for “choosing” to exist outside of this ideal.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Relational-Cultural Approach to Addressing Sex Slavery & Human Trafficking

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Research & Action Report, Fall/Winter 2012

By Connie Gunderson, Ph.D.

Trafficking in human beings is the second most lucrative illegal activity worldwide. Human trafficking is an extreme example of social injustice perpetuated by dominant-subordinate attitudes that condone violence, resulting in significant suffering for individuals and harm to societies (Gunderson, 2012). It is a serious human rights violation and a low-risk, high-profit crime that is well hidden, underreported, under-prosecuted, and where trafficked persons experience extreme forms of physical and psychological violence and death.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Commentary: Expanded Learning: Opportunities for Partnerships with a New Twist and a New Name

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Research & Action Report, Spring/Summer 2012
by Ellen Gannett, M.Ed.

The current debate on the virtues, definition, and efficacy of expanded learning opportunities (ELO) is familiar and welcome. With over 30 years in the field, I have watched the landscape of the out-of-school time field twist and turn by the decade and I am seeing earlier ideas presented in new terminology. Back in 1982, when the first director of the National Institute on Out-of-School Time (NIOST), Michelle Seligson and co-author, James Levine wrote the inaugural School Age Child Care: An Action Manual, their guiding premise was that “solutions are really to be found at the community level, and that they can best be developed by mobilizing people with similar interests to help one another.” The book emphasized a model of service delivery called “the partnership” between schools and other community groups and agencies. While it has taken decades to get here, there is promise in ELO if we can overcome previous barriers.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Layli Maparyan Appointed the New Executive Director of the Wellesley Centers for Women

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Research & Action Report, Spring/Summer 2012

Wellesley College President H. Kim Bottomly announced on April 23, 2012, the appointment of Layli Maparyan, Ph.D., as the new Katherine Stone Kaufmann ’67 Executive Director of the Wellesley Centers for Women (WCW), one of the nation’s largest and most influential organizations conducting scholarly research and developing action programs centered on women’s and girls’ perspectives. Maparyan will assume her new responsibilities effective July 1, 2012.

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