• Eliminating Cultural Biases in Pursuit of High-Quality Education
    NEWS

    Eliminating Cultural Biases in Pursuit of High-Quality Education

    August 2018

    Researchers at WCW used the power of data to investigate and eliminate cultural biases in an afterschool program assessment tool, ensuring that results will accurately indicate the quality level of youth programs.

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  • Celebrate 50 Years of Social Change with Us
    EVENT

    Celebrate 50 Years of Social Change with Us

    September 27, 2018

    Barbara Newell, Ph.D., former president of Wellesley College, will kick start our Lunchtime Seminar Series with a special conversation on her motivation for founding the Centers and her hopes for its future. Join us or watch online.

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  • Summer Reading with Women's Review of Books
    NEWS

    Summer Reading with Women's Review of Books

    Summer 2018

    The new issue looks at a mix of summer fiction and academic, gender-focused works.

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  • Quality Summer Learning in Action
    BLOG

    Quality Summer Learning in Action

    June 2018

    Elizabeth Starr, M.Ed., of WCW's National Institute on Out-of-School Time reflects on the creative, supportive environment she witnessed at a choreography summer camp program.

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The

Wellesley Centers for Women 

is a premier women- and gender-focused, social-change oriented research-and-action institute at Wellesley College.
Our mission is to advance gender equality, social justice, and human wellbeing through high quality research, theory, and action programs.

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A World That Is Good for Women Is Good for Everyone TM

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Wellesley Centers for Women

Q&A with Jean Hardisty, Ph.D.: Women’s Lives and U.S. Public Policy— Where We Are Now

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Research & Action Report, Fall/Winter 2012

Interview by Susan Lowry Rardin

This is a fateful time for the United States. Two distinct visions for the country were pitted against each other in the recent elections. Clearly, women’s rights are still in question; civil rights are seen by some as irrelevant; and the federal budget deficit looms without a consensus as to its importance or how to fix it.

Public policy decisions, which often seem about war and the budget, are, in fact, always about women as well. Though we must focus on “women’s issues,” we must not lose sight of the importance for women of economic and military issues, Supreme Court and other judicial court appointments, and even environmental policies. As the Wellesley Centers for Women motto goes: “A world that is good for women is good for everyone.” - Jean Hardisty, Ph.D.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Commentary: Putting Children First -“Innocence” in Childhood & the Risk for Child Commercial Sexual Exp...

Research & Action Report, Fall/Winter 2012

By Kate Price, M.A.

As a society, we often seem to care more about protecting our cultural ideal of childhood innocence than about meeting the actual needs of real-life children—especially commercially sexually exploited children. To fit the ideal of purity, children require high levels of social capital—preferably, they’re white, middle or upper class, and heterosexual. They have limited or no sexual experience, enjoy secure health care, housing, and education, and they live within a supportive nuclear family. In my experience, children living without access to such resources are too often labeled “bad kids” and blamed for “choosing” to exist outside of this ideal.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Relational-Cultural Approach to Addressing Sex Slavery & Human Trafficking

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Research & Action Report, Fall/Winter 2012

By Connie Gunderson, Ph.D.

Trafficking in human beings is the second most lucrative illegal activity worldwide. Human trafficking is an extreme example of social injustice perpetuated by dominant-subordinate attitudes that condone violence, resulting in significant suffering for individuals and harm to societies (Gunderson, 2012). It is a serious human rights violation and a low-risk, high-profit crime that is well hidden, underreported, under-prosecuted, and where trafficked persons experience extreme forms of physical and psychological violence and death.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Commentary: Expanded Learning: Opportunities for Partnerships with a New Twist and a New Name

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Research & Action Report, Spring/Summer 2012
by Ellen Gannett, M.Ed.

The current debate on the virtues, definition, and efficacy of expanded learning opportunities (ELO) is familiar and welcome. With over 30 years in the field, I have watched the landscape of the out-of-school time field twist and turn by the decade and I am seeing earlier ideas presented in new terminology. Back in 1982, when the first director of the National Institute on Out-of-School Time (NIOST), Michelle Seligson and co-author, James Levine wrote the inaugural School Age Child Care: An Action Manual, their guiding premise was that “solutions are really to be found at the community level, and that they can best be developed by mobilizing people with similar interests to help one another.” The book emphasized a model of service delivery called “the partnership” between schools and other community groups and agencies. While it has taken decades to get here, there is promise in ELO if we can overcome previous barriers.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Layli Maparyan Appointed the New Executive Director of the Wellesley Centers for Women

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Research & Action Report, Spring/Summer 2012

Wellesley College President H. Kim Bottomly announced on April 23, 2012, the appointment of Layli Maparyan, Ph.D., as the new Katherine Stone Kaufmann ’67 Executive Director of the Wellesley Centers for Women (WCW), one of the nation’s largest and most influential organizations conducting scholarly research and developing action programs centered on women’s and girls’ perspectives. Maparyan will assume her new responsibilities effective July 1, 2012.

Wellesley Centers for Women

WCW Scholar Leads Wellesley College/U.S. State Department Institute on Women’s Leadership

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Research & Action Report, Spring/Summer 2012

Wellesley College has joined the U.S. State Department and its sister colleges in presenting the inaugural Women in Public Service Summer Institute on Wellesley’s campus June 11-22, 2012. An integral part of the Women in Public Service Project, the pilot institute is a first-of-its-kind, two-week program that is training the next generation of women leaders.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Commentary: Not a Safe Bet

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Research & Action Report, Fall/Winter 2011
by Amy Hoffman, M.F.A.

In its September 11, 2011, issue, the New York Times Magazine brought together a group of pundits for a roundtable discussion, moderated by reporter Scott Malcolmson, of the 9/11 attacks and the subsequent U.S. wars in Iraq and Afghanistan: Michael Ignatieff, James Traub, David Rieff, Paul Berman, and Ian Buruma. Scott, Michael, James, David, Paul, and Ian: not a woman—nor a person of color—in the bunch. This particular group had been invited because each had published a significant article previously in the magazine about the issues under discussion—which doesn’t justify the choice; if anything, it makes it worse. Not only were women absent from the magazine’s 9/11 anniversary discussion, but we weren’t included in the debates of the past ten years!

Wellesley Centers for Women

Focus on Research at the Jean Baker Miller Intensive Institute

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Research & Action Report, Fall/Winter 2011

Original research was a key focus at this year’s Intensive Institute held in June by the Jean Baker Miller Training Institute (JBMTI) at the Wellesley Centers for Women. All Institute attendees paticipated in a skills-based workshop, “Creating Connection in a Sea of Disconnection: Research Informed Clinical Practice,” with Mary Tantillo, Ph.D., Jennifer Sanftner, Ph.D., and Renee Spencer, Ed.D. The seminar was based on Spencer’s work on mentoring and on Tantillo’s and Sanftner’s recent article, “Measuring Perceived Mutuality in Women: Further Validation of the Connection-Disconnection Scale,” published in the Journal of Creativity in Mental Health.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Q&A with Rangita de Silva-de Alwis, S.J.D.

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Research & Action Report, Fall/Winter 2011

Interview by Susan Lowry Rardin

A lawyer armed with the law in the form of three UN Human Rights Conventions, Rangita de Silva-de Alwis, S.J.D. seeks to amplify women’s efforts on behalf of equality and justice. One of her recent leadership events, organized with Morocco’s Ministry of the Interior, was the “Rabat Roundtable: Women Leading Change in the Arab and Muslim Communities,” which was held late in the 2011 Arab Spring and involved women leaders from the Middle East/North Africa region. Her strategies, which focus especially on Asia and the Muslim/Arab communities, feature the building of networks of women’s organizations and the linking of interest groups—especially through the power of those international human rights Conventions, as she describes in this interview.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Q&A: Investigating the Economic Implications of Women's Realities

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Research & Action Report, Spring/Summer 2011Kerr

with Sari Pekkala Kerr, Ph.D.

Sari Pekala Kerr, Ph.D., who arrived at the Wellesley Centers for Women (WCW) in 2010, brings not only experience in economic research and consulting in the U.S. to her work at WCW, but also expertise in analyzing economic effects of government policies in her homeland of Finland. That expertise became possible because of Finland’s remarkable record of demographic statistics, which reflect—in a breadth of detail that can amaze many—the experience of three generations of Finns. The Centers expect many of Kerr’s contributions to benefit from that research. Her newest project—supported by the Centers’ 35th Anniversary Fund—will study how maternity leave policies in both Finland and the United States affect women’s subsequent employment.

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