Ongoing

Project Director: Peggy McIntosh, Ph.D.

Peggy McIntosh offers presentations, workshops, and consulting on: white privilege and privilege systems in general, diversifying organizational thinking, gender-fair and multicultural curricula, diversifying teaching methods, and feelings of fraudulence.

Peggy McIntosh's speaking engagements and copyright fees are handled through this Project. Her email address for inquiries is mmcintosh@wellesley.edu.

She offers presentations, workshops, and consulting on: white privilege and privilege systems in general, diversifying organizational thinking, gender-fair and multicultural curricula, diversifying teaching methods, and feelings of fraudulence.

Peggy McIntosh is associate director of the Wellesley Centers for Women and founder and co-director of the National SEED Project on Inclusive Curriculum. Her 1986 essay on white privilege and male privilege, published in 1988, and her subsequent 1989 article entitled "White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack," started a national and international conversation on white privilege and privilege systems in general. It provided a new lens for looking at power relations in all aspects of institutional and social life. Where there is discrimination there is also a corollary exemption from discrimination. She named the corollary "unearned advantage." She used personal examples to illustrate the operations of systemic overadvantage in her own life, by contrast with the lives of her African American colleagues in the same building and line of work.

Since her publications in 1988 and 1989, the concept of white privilege has developed into an essential feature of studies of oppression and power, and has evolved into an academic and activist field in its own right.

McIntosh is in demand as a compelling speaker whose talks and workshops provide an empowering conceptual framework for looking at dominance and subordination in the psyche and the society. All of her talks, ranging in length from 1 hour (keynotes) to three days (workshops and retreats) have one or more interactive components. When the primary talk is on white privilege, she shares the time, attention, publicity and fees with one or more persons of color.

McIntosh delivers keynote addresses, consults, and facilitates workshops at over 30 venues each year, including colleges, universities, K-12 schools, churches, communities, research centers, foundations, law firms, and conferences of associations and organizations. Sites where she has presented in the past 12 months include Johns Hopkins University, University of Maryland, University of Pennsylvania, University of San Diego, Notre Dame University, Kalamazoo College, Hong Kong Institute of Education, City University of Hong Kong, Piedmont Behavioral Health Care (NC), National Association of Law Professionals, St. Mary's College, the UN Commission on the Status of Women, North Carolina Department of Public Instruction, Northwest Regional YWCA, University of Wisconsin, Concord Academy (MA), Windward School (CA), Park School (MD), Northampton Community College (PA), Charlotte Country Day School, Allentown (PA) YWCA, the White Privilege 7 and 8 Conferences, National Conference on Race and Ethnicity, Race Relations Center of East Tennessee, and the Independent Schools Association of the Central States.

Peggy McIntosh's consulting on curricula, teaching methods, and feelings of fraudulence rests on 23 years of classroom experience and 21 years of work with teachers in the National SEED Project , the professional development project she founded to help teachers make their curriculum, teaching methods, and school climates more gender-fair, multicultural, and international.

All fees from McIntosh's speaking engagements and copyright permissions go to support the work of the National SEED Project on Inclusive Curriculum (Seeking Educational Equity and Diversity), based at the Wellesley Centers for Women, Wellesley College.


Related Projects: GEMSSEED