• The Gender Pay Gap is Largely Because of Motherhood
    NEWS

    The Gender Pay Gap is Largely Because of Motherhood

    May 2017

    College-educated women start out making about 90 percent as much as men, but by age 45 the pay gap widens to 55 percent. The reason? Marriage, children, or both, according to WCW Senior Research Scientist and Economist Sari Pekkala Kerr, Ph.D. and her colleagues.

    Read more about Dr. Kerr's findings in The New York Times>>
  • 13 Reasons Why and the Need for Correct Messages About Teen Depression and Suicide
    BLOG

    13 Reasons Why and the Need for Correct Messages About Teen Depression and Suicide

    May 2017

    On our #womenchangeworlds blog, Tracy Gladstone, Ph.D. addresses the Netflix series 13 Reasons Why, "...given that so many teens have watched this series already, we must embrace this opportunity to teach our children, and ourselves, about youth depression and suicide."

    Read Dr. Gladstone's advice>>
  • From Persistence to Power: Facts, Truth & Equity for Women
    EVENT

    From Persistence to Power: Facts, Truth & Equity for Women

    June 7, 2017

    Together, the Institute for Women’s Policy Research, the Women’s Research & Resource Center at Spelman College, and the Wellesley Centers for Women, are convening leading researchers, advocates, practitioners, and policymakers for meaningful discussion on the issues that impact women and girls, families and communities.

    Get the details for our upcoming conference in Washington, DC>>
  • Women's Review of Books
    NEWS

    The Lesbian Hero's Journey

    May/June 2017

    In the new Women's Review of Books, Author Abe Louise Young reviews Cassandra Langer's Romaine Brooks: A Life, which portrays the American painter as a genius who has been overlooked due to sexism, miscategorization as a symbolist, and exaggeration of her fascist sympathies.

    Read More>>
The Wellesley Centers for Women is a premier women- and gender-focused, social-change oriented research-and-action institute at Wellesley College.
Our mission is to advance gender equality, social justice, and human wellbeing through high quality research, theory, and action programs.

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Wellesley Centers for Women

Promoting Public Awareness of the Road to Educational Equity for Girls of Color: A Multi-level Strategy

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Ongoing since 2011
Educational Equity

The goal of this collaborative project is to invite public discourse about overcoming barriers to educational equity for girls of color in order to affect educational policy and practice. The specific goal of the project was to create a multi-media strategy in two phases in order to stimulate conversation almongst multiple constituencies.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Media and Identity Study

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Ongoing since 2011
Studies

The purpose of this online nationwide survey study is to understand how different types of media (i.e. social, technological, televised) impact young people’s sense of social identities, including racial/ethnic, gender, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, political attitudes, and civic engagement.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Open Circle

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Ongoing since 1987
Social and Emotional Learning: Kindergarten - Grade 5

Open Circle provides evidence-based social and emotional learning (SEL) curriculum and professional development for elementary schools.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Growth and Scaling Grants Program for Social and Emotional Learning Program Providers

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Ongoing since 2013
Social and Emotional Learning

Funding will support refining plans for growing and scaling Open Circle to serve large school districts across the U.S.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Gratitude Project

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Ongoing since 2015
Open Circle

Open Circle will develop, pilot, and assess new gratitude components for its student curriculum and teacher professional development program.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Commentary: Let’s Talk about #Sex

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Research & Action Report, Spring/Summer 2016

By Jennifer Grossman Ph.D.

Think about it—in many of our parents’ and grandparents’ generations, there was little family conversation about sex. Often, for religious and cultural reasons, family communication about sex was considered taboo. Many teens did not know what sex was or how to protect themselves from pregnancy or sexually transmitted infections (STIs). This has changed in many families, as cultural expectations have shifted and there is growing recognition that teenparent sexuality communication can protect teens from early pregnancy and STIs. Many parents also have reflected on the potentially harmful effects that ignorance about sexuality had on their own teenage years and lived experiences. Parents now often commit to talking with their children about sex, breaking from traditions of family silence from past generations, as a way to support their children’s healthy development.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Commentary with Jennifer Grossman

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Let’s Talk about #Sex by Jennifer Grossman, Ph.D.

Think about it—in many of our parents’ and grandparents’ generations, there was little family conversation about sex. Often, for religious and cultural reasons, family communication about sex was considered taboo. Many teens did not know what sex was or how to protect themselves from pregnancy or sexually transmitted infections (STIs). This has changed in many families, as cultural expectations have shifted and there is growing recognition that teenparent sexuality communication can protect teens from early pregnancy and STIs. Many parents also have reflected on the potentially harmful effects that ignorance about sexuality had on their own teenage years and lived experiences. Parents now often commit to talking with their children about sex, breaking from traditions of family silence from past generations, as a way to support their children’s healthy development.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Recommendations: Quality Out-of-School Time

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by Ellen Gannett, M.Ed. and Elizabeth Starr, M.Ed., National Institute on Out-of-School Time


Quality Out-of-School Time Begins with Investment in Staff

As expectations for high-quality afterschool and outof-school time (OST) programs continue to rise, a skilled, stable and committed OST workforce is critically important. Yet supports for youth workers, and resulting staff quality, remain uneven at best due in part to a highly fragmented landscape. Compensation remains stagnant and opportunities for professional advancement and public recognition remain practically non-existent.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Recommended Reading for the Next President

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The March April 2016 issue of Women’s Review of Books (WRB) was quite different from the publication’s usual offering. Amy Hoffman, M.F.A., editor-in-chief, included a special section featuring WRB writers and some other favorite feminists sharing recommendations of what they thought the next U.S. president should be reading, in preparation for taking office. Additionally, Cartoon Editor Jennifer Camper illustrated the special section and added brevity with her artwork. The list that resulted is fascinating—and could probably keep even the most well-read person productively busy for the entire next presidential term. But it wasn’t quite what Hoffman expected.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Recommendations: Preventing Depression in Young People

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By Tracy R.G. Gladstone, Ph.D., WCW associate director and senior research scientist, director of the Robert S. and Grace W. Stone Primary Prevention Initiatives


Depression is Prevalent but Prevention Programs Are Limited

According to the World Health Organization, depression is the leading cause of disability worldwide—it is the most common psychiatric disorder in the U.S., and is particularly common among lower income populations, and among women beginning in adolescence. The average age of onset for depression is 15, and about 20 percent of all people will have experienced an episode of depression by the end of adolescence. Youth depression is associated with a host of negative and long-term consequences, including poorer school performance, difficult peer and family relationships, increased risk of substance abuse, and poorer functional outcomes in adulthood. Of particular note is the connection between youth depression and suicide. Although not all people who commit suicide were depressed at the time, depression and suicidal behavior are indeed linked. Suicide is a tremendous problem in the U.S. and is the second leading cause of death among American adolescents.