• Addressing DACA Impact on School Climate
    BLOG

    Addressing DACA Impact on School Climate

    September 2017

    Kamilah Drummond-Forrester of WCW's Open Circle took to the Women Change Worlds blog to respond to the DACA decision, addressing its potential impact on school climate and how social and emotional learning can help educators and students in challenging times.

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  • Women's Review of Books
    NEWS

    New Women's Review of Books Is Here

    September/October 2017

    The new issue of Women's Review looks at books by and about women on gender politics in Egypt, the demise of lesbian culture, the impact of China's one-child policy, and the writing of Pat Parker.

    Browse the issue>>
  • Developing Babies’ Literacy Skills
    BLOG

    Developing Babies’ Literacy Skills

    September 2017

    Wendy Wagner Robeson, Ed.D., highlights the ways parents, caregivers, and other adults can help infants and young children develop strong literacy skills.

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  • Lunchtime Seminar Series
    EVENT

    Join Us for Our Thought-Provoking Discussion Series at Wellesley College

    October/November 2017

    Researchers, project directors, and friends of WCW will share works in progress or lead discussions on issues surrounding gender equality, social justice, and human wellbeing during our Lunchtime Seminar Series. Those who can't attend in person can watch presentations live on Facebook.

    Go to event calendar>>
  • Back to School, This Time with Social and Emotional Learning
    BLOG

    Back to School, This Time with Social and Emotional Learning

    September 2017

    Gwynne Guzzeau, M.S., J.D., of WCW's National Institute on Out-of-School Time explains what social and emotional learning is all about and why you may notice schools sending home forms about it.

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  • In the news
    NEWS

    WCW in the News

    Our research scientists and project directors discuss their work and share expertise with major news outlets.

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The Wellesley Centers for Women is a premier women- and gender-focused, social-change oriented research-and-action institute at Wellesley College.
Our mission is to advance gender equality, social justice, and human wellbeing through high quality research, theory, and action programs.

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Wellesley Centers for Women

Prevention of Child & Adolescent Depression in Latin America

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tinyglobe Tracy Gladstone, Ph.D., also traveled to Santiago, Chile in April 2015 where she presented at the inaugural symposium on the Prevention and Early Interventions in Mental Health focused on “Prevention of Depression: Translating Research Into Practice.” This is the first version of a series of biennial conferences that aims to develop new and/or updated strategies and action plans, and seek to broaden the support for evidence-based prevention and promotion in mental health in Chile and Latin America; it was organized by the Child And Adolescent Psychiatry Unit, Department of Psychiatry, University of Chile. Gladstone presented on the CATCH-IT program which utilizes an internet-based interactive system to prevent the onset of a depressive episode in at-risk teens.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Women’s Studies and Women in Academia

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tinyglobe Peggy McIntosh, Ph.D., founder of the National SEED Project on Inclusive Curriculum (Seeking Educational Equity & Diversity presented at a conference on women’s studies in China and other parts of the world held at Capital Normal University in Beijing, June 26-28, 2015. This program was hosted by The Center for Studies in Chinese Women’s Culture, the Forum on Women’s Literature in Chinese, and the Women’s Literature Commission of the China World Association for Chinese Literatures. McIntosh delivered a keynote speech at the opening ceremony of the conference which focused on women’s studies.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Commentary with Jondou Chase Chen

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Research & Action Report, Fall/Winter 2014

by Jondou Chase Chen, Ph.D.
with Gail Cruise-Roberson, B.A., Emmy Howe, M.Ed., and Emily Style , M.A.

Jondou Chase Chen, Ph.D. is an associate director of The National SEED Project on Inclusive Curriculum. Chen has been a SEED leader since 2003 and a SEED summer staff member since 2005. He is an associate in the department of Human Development at Teachers College, Columbia University, where he teaches, advises, and provides research and grant support. He co-facilitates a graduate-level SEED course, as well as a monthly SEED support group for recently trained New York City-area SEED leaders.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Commentary with Sumru Erkut

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Research & Action Report, Fall/Winter 2014

by Sumru, Erkut, Ph.D.

Sumru Erkut, Ph.D., is a senior research scientist at the Wellesley Centers for Women; she served as an Associate Director from 1995 to 2014. Her research has encompassed variations in the course of child and adult development, women and leadership, and educational program evaluation both in the U.S. and abroad.

Wellesley Centers for Women

WCW Research Shows Effectiveness of A Middle School Sex Ed Program

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Research & Action Report, Fall/Winter 2014

In late October, Planned Parenthood League of Massachusetts, the Wellesley Centers for Women, Planned Parenthood Federation of America, and ETR announced new findings published in the Journal of School Health that show Planned Parenthood’s middle-school curriculum, Get Real: Comprehensive Sex Education That Works, helps kids wait until they are older to have sex. It is particularly effective for boys.

Wellesley Centers for Women

From 40 to 50: A Roadmap to Our Half Century Mark

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Research & Action Report, Fall/Winter 2014

An organization’s theory of change helps explain the process by which that organization’s activities contribute to desired outcomes. At WCW, we operate with a shared understanding that research, theory, and action all make vital contributions to the social-change process. High-quality research provides data about what is, tests theories about why, and evaluates what works, allowing us to see beyond opinion, to raise awareness about important issues, and make better investments in policies, programs, and practices that are effective. When change makers, decision makers, and opinion leaders are informed by rigorous research, their initiatives are more likely to be successful.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Commentary: How Research Accelerates Social Change for Women and Girls

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Research & Action Report Spring/Summer 2014

by Layli Maparyan, Ph.D.

The 58th United Nations Commission on the Status of Women (UN CSW) was held this past winter, but the work continues. After two weeks devoted to the assessment of whether the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) are working for women and girls and trying to figure out what the post-2015 development agenda is going to look like, one thing is clear: We aren’t going to make real progress without good data.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Q & A with Erika Kates, Ph.D.: Building a Women's Justice Network in Massachusetts

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Research & Action Report Spring/Summer 2014

Wellesley Centers for Women (WCW) maintains a strong legacy of research that can accelerate social change. Building on that, Kates teaches and practices participatory research—which is research that actively involves multiple groups of stakeholders on the issues being examined. Whenever possible, she includes representatives of the low-income women she’s studying.

The Massachusetts Women’s Justice Network mentioned in this interview is comprised of researchers; state legislators and/or their aides; personnel from the Department of Corrections and the Executive Office of Public Safety and Security; representatives of the Department of Public Health (which administers the state’s substance abuse services); the Office of Probation and Community Corrections; women’s commissions; women’s shelters; the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) and other advocacy groups; and formerly incarcerated women.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Q&A with Tamara Beauboeuf-Lafontant, Ed.D.: Daughters of Educated Men: School Girls, College Women, and...

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Research & Action Report, Fall/Winter 2013

Interview with Tamara Beauboeuf-Lafontant

Serving as a Visiting Scholar at the Wellesley Centers for Women during her sabbatical year from DePauw University, Tamara Beauboeuf-Lafontant is pursuing her interest in women’s responses to their cultures’ expectations for them. Her current research focus is the lives of the women of the Progressive Era in the U.S. who established settlement houses in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. As a side note, she finds it interesting that Harriet Alleyne Rice, Wellesley College’s first African American graduate (1887), spent some time as a medical practitioner at Jane Addams’s Hull-House, Chicago’s first social settlement house.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Commentary: Thinking about Trafficking

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Research & Action Report, Fall/Winter 2013

By Sally Engle Merry, Ph.D.

Trafficking is one of the hottest topics in the global reform world these days, but it is increasingly unclear what is meant by “trafficking.” It is often hard to know who is trafficked and even more difficult to count these populations. Moreover, simply identifying trafficked victims and traffickers is difficult; for purposes of this article, I will be discussing issues related to women only. A woman may migrate in search of a job and end up doing sex work in exploitative conditions. A migrant may intend to take on one kind of work and find herself in another, or go back and forth between sex work and other forms of work depending on circumstances.