• Can Extended Family Keep Teens from Making Risky Sexual Decisions?
    NEWS

    Can Extended Family Keep Teens from Making Risky Sexual Decisions?

    April 2018

    WCW researchers investigate how extended family members can help teens make smarter decisions about dating, sex, and relationships.

    Keep reading>>
  • How To Be a Change Agent
    VIDEO

    How To Be a Change Agent

    Each person has systems in which they are privileged or oppressed. Once a person is aware of how they fit into a system, they can work to change a small piece of it, says Emmy Howe.

    Watch the video>>
  • Mother's Day
    GIVE

    Celebrate Mother's Day with WCW

    For Mother's Day, we asked our friends what they want the world to know about the women in their lives.

    Find out what they said>>
  • Women's Review of Books
    NEWS

    New Women's Review of Books

    March/April 2018

    This issue looks at books about Colombian painter and intellectual Emma Reyes, activist and co-founder of Black Lives Matter Patrisse Khan-Cullors, the difficulties scholars of color face in gaining tenure, and more.

    Keep reading>>
  • Lunchtime Seminar Lineup
    NEWS

    Meet, Think, Learn With Us This Spring

    Spring 2018

    Our spring Lunchtime Seminar Series runs through May 10 and will feature thoughtful discussions on NCAA Women's Basketball, preventing youth depression, activism for scholars, sexual assault prosecution, teacher wellbeing, and child marriage.

    View the calendar>>
The Wellesley Centers for Women is a premier women- and gender-focused, social-change oriented research-and-action institute at Wellesley College.
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Wellesley Centers for Women

Q & A with Monica Driggers: An Update on the Battered Mothers' Testimony Project

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Monica Driggers, research scientist at the Wellesley Centers for Women, has been working on court and criminal justice reform for nearly a decade. Driggers joined the team working on the Battered Mothers’ Testimony Project in 2002 and was one of the authors of its ground-breaking report released that year. She continues to advocate for the reforms proposed in the report. Her current projects include research and reform of parole processes in Massachusetts and an investigation of female prisoners’ connections to their children.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Q&A Empowering Educators Through SEED: An Interview with Peggy McIntosh

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The National Seeking Educational Equity and Diversity (SEED) Project on Inclusive Curriculum is now in its 18th year. The SEED Project prepares teachers to lead year-long, school-based seminars on making school climates, curricula, and teaching methods more gender fair and multiculturally equitable.

Wellesley Centers for Women

The Work of the Jean Baker Miller Training Institute Travels the World

High in the Sierra Madre Mountains of Mexico, the leader of a microeconomic project working with indigenous women weavers gave her staff a Spanish-language version of Jean Baker Miller’s book, Toward a New Psychology of Women (1976/1986). “I wish you could have seen their wide eyes and delight as the women read it,” she reported. This is just one example of the countless ways the work of the Jean Baker Miller Training Institute (JBMTI) touches the lives of people around the world.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Gender-Equitable Education: A Focus on Literacy

Popular media has “balanced” attention to girls’ difficulties in math and science with considerable attention to boys’ difficulties in language arts. It has often been argued that both problems are a reflection of characteristics inherent in gender differences. However, a growing body of research supports the importance of socialization rather than biology in explaining disadvantages in academic subject areas. We believe that attention to gender socialization within the various contexts of children’s lives is key to understanding how best to prepare all students, girls and boys, for academic success.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Human Rights Activists From West Africa Visit WCW

Research & Action Report Spring/Summer 2004

international work  In early February, Molly Melching, executive director of Tostan, a Senegal-based nongovernmental organization, and Kerthio Diarra, a Senegalese village woman and human rights activist, visited the Wellesley Centers for Women (WCW). Melching and Diarra spent two days at the Centers meeting and talking with WCW staff before continuing on to Washington, D.C., and a congressional briefing on female genital cutting (FGC). The congressional hearings were scheduled for February 6, a day designated to recognize international efforts to end FGC and raise awareness about the issue; February 6 also marked 13 years of work for Tostan.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Empowering Girls: Nigerian Activists Focus on Gender and Sexuality

international work  By Deborah L. Tolman
Last May, I met with an international group of women who provide reproductive-health and sexuality-education services to adolescent girls in developing countries with support from the International Women’s Health Coalition.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Students at the Centers

Students are a vivid presence throughout the three buildings that house the Wellesley Centers for Women—at the copy machine, at computers, and at the reception desk. Each year, WCW hires approximately 70 students in a variety of clerical and research positions.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Uncovering Links Between Childhood Abuse and Delinquency in Girls

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According to National estimates, every year more than 700,000 adolescent girls are arrested and brought into the juvenile-justice system. In fact, today, adolescent girls comprise about 28% of all juvenile arrests. Have girls become increasingly more violent in recent years? Is the violent behavior of girls different from that of boys? Do girls need different criminal-justice-system responses to help them cope with the problems they face? And, since many of these girls have experienced abuse in childhood, is there a link between childhood abuse and adolescent delinquency?

Wellesley Centers for Women

Add Drama, Multiply Interest: A New Way to Teach Math

Making mathematics interesting to young children has been an ongoing challenge faced by parents, teachers, and other education professionals for years. The problem is that children are asked to do abstract mathematical activities that have little intrinsic meaning for them. As a result, children often remain disengaged. Even the attempts to bring in “relevant” or “real world” examples—such as how many cookies each child will get or how long would you have to wait in line—are still not compelling enough to engage a young mind.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Q&A With WCW Postdoctoral Research Fellows

The Wellesley Centers for Women (WCW) has three postdoctoral research positions sponsored by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD). In the summer of 2004 researchers were selected and matched with a mentor. During their two-year tenure at WCW, the fellows receive training in a variety of skills ranging from methodology to preparing a manuscript for publication and writing grant proposals. The program is designed to prepare the junior researchers to become senior scholars in the study of childhood and adolescence, with special emphasis on how race and ethnicity, gender, and social class interact with risk and resilience factors in human development. Fellows can collaborate with their mentors on externally funded research projects and can initiate independent research conducted under the guidance of their mentor. Sumru Erkut is working with Michelle Bragg, Linda Williams is teamed with Diane Purvin, and Nancy Marshall is partnered with Jasmine Waddell.