• WCW Co-Hosts Inaugural Women of Color Conference at Wellesley College
    NEWS

    WCW Co-Hosts Inaugural Women of Color Conference at Wellesley College

    June 2018

    Presenters focused on self care, rejuvenation, creativity, and empowerment throughout the Women of Color Conference held in partnership by WCW and The Home for Little Wanderers in June at Wellesley College.

    Keep reading>>
  • Separating Parents from Children: A Policy of Abuse?
    BLOG

    Separating Parents from Children: A Policy of Abuse?

    June 2018

    "When you look through the lens of neuroscience there is no debate -- ripping children from parents is extraordinarily traumatizing," writes WCW's Amy Banks, M.D., in a blog looking at the Trump Administration's "zero tolerance" border policy.

    Keep reading>>
  • Family Equality Council Honors Dana Rudolph ’88 for LGBTQ Parenting Blog
    NEWS

    Family Equality Council Honors Dana Rudolph ’88 for LGBTQ Parenting Blog

    May 2018

    Last month, Family Equality Council honored WCW's Dana Rudolph ’88 for her writing and advocating for LGBTQ parents on her blog Mombian, in media outlets across the country, and through organizing the annual #LGBTQFamiliesDay.

    Keep reading>>
  • Read our Research & Action Report
    NEWS

    Read our Research & Action Report

    June 2018

    Keep up with all of the ways we are advancing social change through research and action in our newest Report. It features highlights from our panel at the United Nations, new research findings, publications, and recent presentations.

    Learn more>>
  • Five Ways to Create Fun Summer Learning for Kids
    NEWS

    Five Ways to Create Fun Summer Learning for Kids

    June 2018

    Georgia Hall, Ph.D., director of the National Institute on Out-of-School Time, shares tips for using summer as a time to help close the achievement gap and empower youth to succeed in the classroom.

    Learn more>>
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The

Wellesley Centers for Women

is a premier women- and gender-focused, social-change oriented research-and-action institute at Wellesley College.
Our mission is to advance gender equality, social justice, and human wellbeing through high quality research, theory, and action programs.

PROJECTS

Give

A World That Is Good for Women Is Good for Everyone TM

GO TO GIVE

Wellesley Centers for Women

Battered Women: What Goes Into the Stay-leave Decision?

The question most frequently asked of advocates and professionals who work with battered women is: “Why do women stay with men who abuse them?” The short answer is that they don’t: most women who are abused by an intimate partner do not stay with their abusers permanently. Most leave eventually, although the process of leaving may take months or years, with many starts and stops. Unfortunately, the end of the relationship does not necessarily mean the end of the abuse. For these reasons, a more fruitful question to ask is: “What goes into the decision to stay or leave?”

Wellesley Centers for Women

Still Stuck in Low Wage Jobs: Is It Time That We Solve the Youth Worker Compensation Problem?

Afterschool practitioners and youth workers play a critical role in today’s society, serving as positive adult role models, mentors, coaches, tutors and friends for young people, and a vital support for working parents. Too often, however, these practitioners do not receive the recognition or resources they need to feel valued in their work by the public and, more importantly, by their employers. While most youth workers are educated, satisfied and committed to making a difference in the lives of the children and youth they serve, too many report being underpaid, underappreciated, and at times overworked, often holding down multiple jobs just to make a living wage. Stress and burnout are all too real and recruitment of qualified administrators and staff remains challenging. For our most vulnerable youth who depend on quality out-of-school time programs, it is imperative that private and public policy makers understand the domino effect that results from underpaid youth workers.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Making a Difference with Research

Can research make a difference? Some view research as a useless ivory tower activity of little meaning. Others expect that research will be so compelling that policy makers will immediately adopt the recommendations. Still others find the plethora of research confusing and contradictory. If research is to make a difference, four conditions must be met. Effective research must 1) be guided by explicit paradigms, 2) be informed by experience and practice, 3) use methods appropriate to the goals, and 4) get into the right hands, the right forums, the right boardrooms.

Wellesley Centers for Women

The Human Brain: Hardwired for Connections

Q&A with Amy Banks, M.D. and Judith Jordan, Ph.D

The Stone Theory Group developed Relational-Cultural Theory (RCT) in the 1970s and the Jean Baker Miller Training Institute has been teaching and applying these ideas for over ten years. Why is it that so much research on the brain is coming out just now?

AB:  It’s partly about the technology. Twenty years ago we could take snapshots of the brain but now we are able to scan the brain in action. Using SPECT* scans we can record functioning brains responding in different situations. It’s like getting an MRI when your brain is doing something.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Q&A with Linda Gardiner, Editor of The Women's Review of Books

The Women's Review of Books is published monthly at the Center for Research on Women. It is the only U.S. publication to focus exclusively on books by and about women. Linda Gardiner founded The Women's Review of Books in 1983 and has been its editor ever since.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Removing Hurdles to Higher Education

This September, as thousands of men and women headed back to college in pursuit of higher education, many welfare recipients were deprived of this opportunity. Current restrictive welfare policies, with their stringent time limits and work requirements, make access to post-secondary education extremely difficult. Both the passage of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA) of 1996 and the institution of Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) emphasize moving welfare recipients into the workforce as quickly as possible, making it difficult for them to pursue higher education. According to Haskins and Blank, writing in Poverty Research News (Joint Center for Poverty Research, 2001), the work-first approach has raised the employment rate without improving job quality, pushing low-income women in particular into low-wage, unstable jobs.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Coming Together, Learning Together

On September 12, 2001, as the whole country was trying to make sense of the events of the previous day, parents and teachers had the even tougher task of helping young children deal with trauma. For participants of Open Circle, a social competency program of the Wellesley Centers for Women, the task was slightly easier.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Strengthening Our Resilience in a Risky World: It Is About Relationships

Over the last year we have faced monumental adversity - a devastating national tragedy, ongoing concerns about terrorism, unpredictable international conflict, a serious downturn in the economy, as well as many other hardships related to these traumatic circumstances. These adversities are testing the courage and fortitude of individuals, families, and communities throughout our country and around the world. In response, many researchers and clinicians have renewed or expanded their efforts to understand how people overcome trauma, severe hardships, and adverse conditions - that is, they have been studying resilience.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Packing Power In After-School Hours

Little attention was being paid to the development of after-school opportunities Twenty-five years ago when Michelle (Mickey) Seligson and Jim Levine met to create the School-Age Child Care Project. At that time, Jim was assistant director for the Human Relations-Youth Resources Commission in Brookline, Massachusetts, and Mickey was helping several parent groups in Brookline set up afterschool day care programs. When mention of Mickey's projects in two national magazines drew over 1,500 letters requesting more information, it became clear that there was a great need for such projects across the country.

Wellesley Centers for Women

School Interventions, Not Zero Tolerance, Prevent Gender Violence

Effective materials for students, school personnel, and parents are critical to combating bullying and sexual harassment in schools. Creating such tools is a core interest of senior research scientist Nan Stein, a former middle school teacher whose work ranges from anti-bullying and harassment curricula to new work on the dangers that zero tolerance laws pose to children's civil rights. The sale of more than

75,000 copies of Stein's three curricula attests to the need for such classroom tools.

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