• New Scholars Explore Motherhood and Women's Lives
    NEWS

    New Scholars Explore Motherhood and Women's Lives

    December 2018

    In our annual report, three scholars new to WCW share their expertise and why they are building on their research at WCW.

    Keep reading>>
  • Commentary: Immigrant Entrepreneurship in America
    BLOG

    Commentary: Immigrant Entrepreneurship in America

    December 2018

    Dr. Sari Pekkala Kerr shares key lessons from emerging data on immigrant entrepreneurs in the U.S. that can inform policy development.

    Keep reading>>
  • Women's Review of Books
    NEWS

    A Celebration of Feminist Publishing

    December 2018

    The Women's Review of Books celebrates the feminist bookstore movement and the innovation of feminist writers and publishers.

    Keep reading>>
  • Let’s Put the Humanity Back into Human Rights
    BLOG

    Let’s Put the Humanity Back into Human Rights

    December 2018

    WCW's Layli Maparyan encourages us to think about how we are dehumanizing each other, and find our way back to affirming one another’s full humanity.

    Keep reading>>
Previous Slide Next Slide
The

Wellesley Centers for Women 

is a premier women- and gender-focused, social-change oriented research-and-action institute at Wellesley College.
Our mission is to advance gender equality, social justice, and human wellbeing through high quality research, theory, and action programs.

PROJECTS

Give

A World That Is Good for Women Is Good for Everyone TM

GO TO GIVE

Wellesley Centers for Women

Looking Back & Looking Forward: A Half Century of Social Change, 1974-2024

Tags:

Wellesley Centers for Women will celebrate its 50th anniversary in 2024 and in recognition of this milestone has launched a history project, “Looking Back & Looking Forward: A Half Century of Social Change, 1974-2024.” This multi-year initiative will feature a collection of historical information about the foundation, growth, projects, events, social impact of, and the people and partners related to the Centers’ research-and-action work. Progressing until 2024, pieces for the collection will be produced, curated, and archived on the WCW website, wcwonline.org/halfcentury.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Q&A with Karen Craddock, Ph.D., Visiting Scholar

Tags:

New Scholars Explore Motherhood and Women’s Lives

Applied psychologist Karen Craddock, Ph.D., initially joined the Centers in 2014 as a scholar and faculty member with the Jean Baker Miller Training Institute, a legacy project of WCW. Now she is continuing her studies around Relational Cultural Theory as a WCW visiting scholar and linking it with her work on optimal resistance and resilience. Her work is focused on addressing issues of equity and trauma and developing wellness, strengths, and connection, particularly among marginalized communities.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Q&A with Autumn Green, Ph.D., Research Scientist

Tags:

New Scholars Explore Motherhood and Women’s Lives

Autumn Green, Ph.D., is a new research scientist at the Wellesley Centers for Women and a nationally recognized scholar in higher education and anti-poverty programs. Her work focuses on access to higher education for low-income, first-generation, and non-traditional students, especially student parents. Most recently, she served as principal investigator on projects funded through the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, Ascend at the Aspen Institute, and the U.S. Department of Education as director of national replication for the Keys to Degrees Program, founding director of the National Center for Student Parent Programs, and assistant professor of Sociology at Endicott College. Green’s recent seminar, “On-Campus with Kids: Supporting Student Parents in Higher Education,” presented with Nicole Parsons, Ed.D., is available at wcwonline.org/video.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Q&A with Hauwa Ibrahim, J.D., S.J.D., M.L., Visiting Scholar

Tags:

New Scholars Explore Motherhood and Women’s Lives

Hauwa Ibrahim, J.D., S.J.D., M.L., has over 15 years of experience in human rights law, including successfully defending 150 women and children in Shariah Courts. During her time as a visiting scholar at WCW, in addition to working on two manuscripts, she is focusing primarily on further developing the Mothers Without Borders initiative, a project that explores how mothers and communities can prevent the radicalization of youth.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Commentary by Sari Pekkala Kerr, Ph.D.

Tags:

Immigrant Entrepreneurship in America: Key Lessons from Recent Research

Immigration plays an important role in the growth of the U.S. population and economy, yet we continue to debate whether it has positive or negative impacts on native U.S. workers, and how these impacts are divided among population groups. In the last few years, it seems that the tone of this debate has become increasingly bitter and the views more divided.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Primary Care and Community-Based Prevention of Mental Disorders in Adolescents

Tags:

Ongoing since 2018

This multi-year study will test of two approaches -- the online intervention CATCH-IT and an in-person group therapy intervention, POD -- to see which can prevent depression in teens.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Bringing the Power of Data to the United Nations

Tags:

Abigail Burgesson, Dorcas Coker-Appiah, Clementina Furtado, Tracy Gladstone, Layli Maparyan, and logo from WCW UN event


WCW hosted a parallel event during the 62nd United Nations Commission on the Status of Women.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Jennifer Baumgardner Named Editor in Chief of Women’s Review of Books

Tags:

Jennifer Baumgardner


Feminist writer and activist Jennifer Baumgardner has been named editor in chief of Women’s Review of Books.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Political Participation in the Digital Age

Tags:

Screen Shot from Linda Charmaraman interview video

March 19, 2018

Does social media activism decrease in-person activism? Linda Charmaraman, Ph.D., discusses this in relation to the 2016 U.S. presidential election. 

Wellesley Centers for Women

Commentary by Wendy Wagner Robeson, Ed.D.

Tags:

Advancing Early Childhood Care and Education Policy in the U.S.

While not always a pressing domestic priority for all Americans, early childhood care and education (ECCE) for young children has been in the forefront for many working families for decades. In order to work or go to school or training, parents need someone to watch their young children before they are old enough to go to school. Sixty-one percent of children under the age of five are in some type of regular ECCE arrangement, and ECEE serves dual purposes. It not only allows parents to be employed or be in school or training, it also helps prepare children for school and academic success—this is especially true for children from families with low incomes. Even quality afterschool care or out-of-school-time care for school-age children can be hard to obtain. Finding the kind of care mothers and fathers want for their children and then learning they can’t afford it has broken many parents’ hearts and budgets. What are they to do? 

Our website uses cookies to enhance your experience. By continuing to use our site, or clicking "Continue", you are agreeing to our privacy policy.
Continue Privacy Policy