In April of 1979, a sixteen-year-old boy was tried as an adult and convicted of killing a professor in New Orleans, LA. He was sentenced to life in prison without parole and sent to Angola, the bloodiest prison in the country, to live out his days. Twelve years later his conviction was overturned due to prosecution misconduct. In this recording of the April 6, 2017 lunchtime seminar, “Fighting Time: Exploring the Social Impact of Wrongful Conviction,” Senior Scholar Amy Banks, M.D., discusses her personal connection to this case.

During the presentation Banks, who is the daughter of the professor killed in New Orleans, leads attendees on an exploration of the complicated impact of a wrongful conviction on the families of both the victim and the accused. She weaves into the discussion excerpts from her third book project, Fighting Time, a collaboration with Isaac Knapper, the man falsely accused of killing her father.

A senior scholar at the Wellesley Centers for Women, Banks has devoted her career to understanding the neurobiology of relationships. She is the author of Four Ways to Click: Rewrite Your Brain for Stronger, More Rewarding Relationships. Banks was the first person to bring Relational-Cultural Theory together with neuroscience and is an expert in the combined field.

 

April 7, 2017

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