• Women's Review of Books: November/December
    NEWS

    Women’s Review of Books

    November/December 2020

    The latest issue of Women's Review of Books tackles change, religion, and feminism through prose and poetry.

    Preview now>>

  • Advancing Racial Justice
    VIDEO

    Advancing Racial Justice Through Research and Action

    October 2020

    Panelists discuss how they advance racial justice in their work at WCW and share ways that others can take steps in their own lives to dismantle systemic racism.

    Keep reading>>

  • Despite Challenges of Pandemic, Depression Study Finds Silver Linings
    BLOG

    Despite Challenges of Pandemic, Depression Study Finds Silver Linings

    October 2020

    Tracy Gladstone, Ph.D., discusses the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic has affected her mental health research as well as the teens she works with. 

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  • WCW Hosts Gender Equality Social Change Dialogue
    VIDEO

    COVID-19 and Gender Equality

    October 2020

    Experts from WCW discuss the compounding ways that COVID-19 is impacting women’s work-life balance, economic opportunity, and mental wellbeing.

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  • https://www.wcwonline.org/2020/wellesley-college-students-begin-virtual-research-internships
    BLOG

    Wellesley College Students Begin Virtual Research Internships

    September 2020

    Six Wellesley College student interns have begun their work with WCW mentors for the 2020-21 academic year.

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The

Wellesley Centers for Women 

is a research and action institute at Wellesley College that is focused on women and gender and driven by social change.
Our mission is to advance gender equality, social justice, and human wellbeing through high-quality research, theory, and action programs.

PROJECTS

Give

A World That Is Good for Women Is Good for Everyone TM

GO TO GIVE

Wellesley Centers for Women

Quality Programming for Kids: Three studies identify key workforce and environment factors

The National Institute on Out-of-School Time (NIOST) at the Wellesley Centers for Women recently completed work on a comprehensive, three-year study on afterschool programs in Massachusetts, in partnership with the Intercultural Center for Research in Education (INCRE). One of the first studies of this scope nationally, the Massachusetts Afterschool Research Study (MARS) stands as a primary opportunity for researchers to examine the relationships between program characteristics and indicators of program quality, and how these relate to youth development outcomes.


Wellesley Centers for Women

Innovations in Understanding

In April, the Wellesley Centers for Women waspleased to welcome colleagues working in 46 countries across the globe to the WCW 2004 International Research and Action Conference: Innovations in Understanding Violence Against Women. Chaired by Linda Williams,Victoria Banyard, and Nada Aoudeh, this truly international meeting was designed for researchers, activists, advocates, and practitioners from the academic, nongovernmental, community-based, and government domains.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Marriage as a Bogus Cure for Poverty: Keeping low-income women safe is in our hands

Story after story of former welfare recipients who now hold jobs have created the dominant media metaphor—women formerly leading hopeless, dead-end lives are required by welfare reform to become employed and now are thrilled with their independence and new sense of self-worth. But the public is little aware of the upcoming reauthorization of the 1996 “Welfare Reform Act”—formally the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA). This Act replaced Aid to Families with Dependent Children assistance to poor and low-income women with Temporary Assistance to Needy Families.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Q & A with Monica Driggers: An Update on the Battered Mothers' Testimony Project

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Monica Driggers, research scientist at the Wellesley Centers for Women, has been working on court and criminal justice reform for nearly a decade. Driggers joined the team working on the Battered Mothers’ Testimony Project in 2002 and was one of the authors of its ground-breaking report released that year. She continues to advocate for the reforms proposed in the report. Her current projects include research and reform of parole processes in Massachusetts and an investigation of female prisoners’ connections to their children.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Q&A Empowering Educators Through SEED: An Interview with Peggy McIntosh

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The National Seeking Educational Equity and Diversity (SEED) Project on Inclusive Curriculum is now in its 18th year. The SEED Project prepares teachers to lead year-long, school-based seminars on making school climates, curricula, and teaching methods more gender fair and multiculturally equitable.

Wellesley Centers for Women

The Work of the Jean Baker Miller Training Institute Travels the World

High in the Sierra Madre Mountains of Mexico, the leader of a microeconomic project working with indigenous women weavers gave her staff a Spanish-language version of Jean Baker Miller’s book, Toward a New Psychology of Women (1976/1986). “I wish you could have seen their wide eyes and delight as the women read it,” she reported. This is just one example of the countless ways the work of the Jean Baker Miller Training Institute (JBMTI) touches the lives of people around the world.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Gender-Equitable Education: A Focus on Literacy

Popular media has “balanced” attention to girls’ difficulties in math and science with considerable attention to boys’ difficulties in language arts. It has often been argued that both problems are a reflection of characteristics inherent in gender differences. However, a growing body of research supports the importance of socialization rather than biology in explaining disadvantages in academic subject areas. We believe that attention to gender socialization within the various contexts of children’s lives is key to understanding how best to prepare all students, girls and boys, for academic success.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Human Rights Activists From West Africa Visit WCW

Research & Action Report Spring/Summer 2004

In early February, Molly Melching, executive director of Tostan, a Senegal-based nongovernmental organization, and Kerthio Diarra, a Senegalese village woman and human rights activist, visited the Wellesley Centers for Women (WCW). Melching and Diarra spent two days at the Centers meeting and talking with WCW staff before continuing on to Washington, D.C., and a congressional briefing on female genital cutting (FGC). The congressional hearings were scheduled for February 6, a day designated to recognize international efforts to end FGC and raise awareness about the issue; February 6 also marked 13 years of work for Tostan.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Empowering Girls: Nigerian Activists Focus on Gender and Sexuality

By Deborah L. Tolman
Last May, I met with an international group of women who provide reproductive-health and sexuality-education services to adolescent girls in developing countries with support from the International Women’s Health Coalition.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Students at the Centers

Students are a vivid presence throughout the three buildings that house the Wellesley Centers for Women—at the copy machine, at computers, and at the reception desk. Each year, WCW hires approximately 70 students in a variety of clerical and research positions.

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