• New Scholars Explore Motherhood and Women's Lives
    NEWS

    New Scholars Explore Motherhood and Women's Lives

    December 2018

    In our annual report, three scholars new to WCW share their expertise and why they are building on their research at WCW.

    Keep reading>>
  • Commentary: Immigrant Entrepreneurship in America
    BLOG

    Commentary: Immigrant Entrepreneurship in America

    December 2018

    Dr. Sari Pekkala Kerr shares key lessons from emerging data on immigrant entrepreneurs in the U.S. that can inform policy development.

    Keep reading>>
  • Women's Review of Books
    NEWS

    A Celebration of Feminist Publishing

    December 2018

    The Women's Review of Books celebrates the feminist bookstore movement and the innovation of feminist writers and publishers.

    Keep reading>>
  • Let’s Put the Humanity Back into Human Rights
    BLOG

    Let’s Put the Humanity Back into Human Rights

    December 2018

    WCW's Layli Maparyan encourages us to think about how we are dehumanizing each other, and find our way back to affirming one another’s full humanity.

    Keep reading>>
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The

Wellesley Centers for Women 

is a premier women- and gender-focused, social-change oriented research-and-action institute at Wellesley College.
Our mission is to advance gender equality, social justice, and human wellbeing through high quality research, theory, and action programs.

PROJECTS

Give

A World That Is Good for Women Is Good for Everyone TM

GO TO GIVE

Wellesley Centers for Women

Q&A with Linda Gardiner, Editor of The Women's Review of Books

The Women's Review of Books is published monthly at the Center for Research on Women. It is the only U.S. publication to focus exclusively on books by and about women. Linda Gardiner founded The Women's Review of Books in 1983 and has been its editor ever since.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Removing Hurdles to Higher Education

This September, as thousands of men and women headed back to college in pursuit of higher education, many welfare recipients were deprived of this opportunity. Current restrictive welfare policies, with their stringent time limits and work requirements, make access to post-secondary education extremely difficult. Both the passage of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA) of 1996 and the institution of Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) emphasize moving welfare recipients into the workforce as quickly as possible, making it difficult for them to pursue higher education. According to Haskins and Blank, writing in Poverty Research News (Joint Center for Poverty Research, 2001), the work-first approach has raised the employment rate without improving job quality, pushing low-income women in particular into low-wage, unstable jobs.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Coming Together, Learning Together

On September 12, 2001, as the whole country was trying to make sense of the events of the previous day, parents and teachers had the even tougher task of helping young children deal with trauma. For participants of Open Circle, a social competency program of the Wellesley Centers for Women, the task was slightly easier.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Strengthening Our Resilience in a Risky World: It Is About Relationships

Over the last year we have faced monumental adversity - a devastating national tragedy, ongoing concerns about terrorism, unpredictable international conflict, a serious downturn in the economy, as well as many other hardships related to these traumatic circumstances. These adversities are testing the courage and fortitude of individuals, families, and communities throughout our country and around the world. In response, many researchers and clinicians have renewed or expanded their efforts to understand how people overcome trauma, severe hardships, and adverse conditions - that is, they have been studying resilience.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Packing Power In After-School Hours

Little attention was being paid to the development of after-school opportunities Twenty-five years ago when Michelle (Mickey) Seligson and Jim Levine met to create the School-Age Child Care Project. At that time, Jim was assistant director for the Human Relations-Youth Resources Commission in Brookline, Massachusetts, and Mickey was helping several parent groups in Brookline set up afterschool day care programs. When mention of Mickey's projects in two national magazines drew over 1,500 letters requesting more information, it became clear that there was a great need for such projects across the country.

Wellesley Centers for Women

School Interventions, Not Zero Tolerance, Prevent Gender Violence

Effective materials for students, school personnel, and parents are critical to combating bullying and sexual harassment in schools. Creating such tools is a core interest of senior research scientist Nan Stein, a former middle school teacher whose work ranges from anti-bullying and harassment curricula to new work on the dangers that zero tolerance laws pose to children's civil rights. The sale of more than

75,000 copies of Stein's three curricula attests to the need for such classroom tools.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Afterschool Learning for the Heart and the Head

The battle for afterschool care has evolved in the past 20 years from the urgent need to create safe, affordable programs to rising demands for good programs that use afterschool time strategically. Although increasing pressures from the nationwide curriculum reform and standardized testing movements push afterschool programs to focus on academic goals, the precious hours between classroom and family room need to include genuine relationships with caring adults outside the hierarchies of school or family, according to the leaders of the Bringing Yourself to Work (BYTW) program.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Q&A with Jo Kim

Jo Kim, a postdoctoral research fellow at the Wellesley Centers for Women since December 2001, studies gender, race and ethnicity, the workplace, immigration, and globalization. Kim did her master's and doctoral degrees in sociology at Columbia University, where she examined workplace relationships between Korean managers and their Korean-American white-collar employees in U.S.-based Korean transnational corporations. In addition to her research interests, Kim is enthusiastic about teaching and working with students and has taught a number of courses in sociology and women's studies at Columbia and Rutgers Universities. In the spring semester of 2004 she will be teaching a course on Asian-American women in the Women's Studies Department at Wellesley College, where she is currently a visiting assistant professor.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Battered Mothers Fight to Survive the Family Court System

Human rights abuse charges are commonly used to attempt to tarnish political leaders and institutions in other countries. However, when the human rights lens focuses on U.S. institutions, such as the Massachusetts family court system, alarming cracks appear in the American assumption of justice at home. The Centers' Battered Mothers' Testimony Project (BMTP) has found that battered women often face yet another form of abuse in court.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Telling the Truth About Power

Many of us in this society are mixed up about power. Yet power is very real and is operating right in front of us all the time. Quite amazingly, those who have the most power in our society almost never talk about it, and, even more amazingly, they induce many of the rest of us not to recognize it, either.

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