• New Editor Joins Women's Review of Books
    NEWS

    New Editor Joins Women's Review of Books

    March 2018

    Feminist writer and activist Jennifer Baumgardner is named new editor in chief of the long-running publication that provides a forum for serious, informed discussion of new writing by and about women.

    Learn more about Jennifer>>
  • Using Research to Support Rural Women and Girls
    VIDEO

    Using Research to Support Rural Women and Girls

    March 2018

    During the United Nations 62nd Commission on the Status of Women, WCW hosted a panel of researchers, advocates, and program staff to share expertise and discuss ways that gender-focused research can improve the lives of women and girls in rural Africa.

    Watch the presentation>>
  • The Importance of Social and Emotional Learning
    VIDEO

    The Importance of Social and Emotional Learning

    Kamilah Drummond-Forrester, M.A., director of WCW action program Open Circle, explains that social and emotional learning is so vital to a school's curriculum because emotion drives attention, and in turn, drives all learning.

    Watch the video>>
  • Lunchtime Seminar Lineup
    NEWS

    Meet, Think, Learn With Us This Spring

    Spring 2018

    Our spring Lunchtime Seminar Series runs through May 10 and will feature thoughtful discussions on NCAA Women's Basketball, preventing youth depression, activism for scholars, sexual assault prosecution, teacher wellbeing, and child marriage.

    View the lineup and save the dates>>
The Wellesley Centers for Women is a premier women- and gender-focused, social-change oriented research-and-action institute at Wellesley College.
Our mission is to advance gender equality, social justice, and human wellbeing through high quality research, theory, and action programs.

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Wellesley Centers for Women

Q&A with Jo Kim

Jo Kim, a postdoctoral research fellow at the Wellesley Centers for Women since December 2001, studies gender, race and ethnicity, the workplace, immigration, and globalization. Kim did her master's and doctoral degrees in sociology at Columbia University, where she examined workplace relationships between Korean managers and their Korean-American white-collar employees in U.S.-based Korean transnational corporations. In addition to her research interests, Kim is enthusiastic about teaching and working with students and has taught a number of courses in sociology and women's studies at Columbia and Rutgers Universities. In the spring semester of 2004 she will be teaching a course on Asian-American women in the Women's Studies Department at Wellesley College, where she is currently a visiting assistant professor.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Battered Mothers Fight to Survive the Family Court System

Human rights abuse charges are commonly used to attempt to tarnish political leaders and institutions in other countries. However, when the human rights lens focuses on U.S. institutions, such as the Massachusetts family court system, alarming cracks appear in the American assumption of justice at home. The Centers' Battered Mothers' Testimony Project (BMTP) has found that battered women often face yet another form of abuse in court.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Telling the Truth About Power

Many of us in this society are mixed up about power. Yet power is very real and is operating right in front of us all the time. Quite amazingly, those who have the most power in our society almost never talk about it, and, even more amazingly, they induce many of the rest of us not to recognize it, either.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Conference on Violence Against Women Sparks Worldwide Interest

Research & Action Report Fall/Winter 2003

international work

 The announcement by the Wellesley Centers for Women of plans to host a spring 2004 conference, Innovations in Understanding Violence against Women, has generated unprecedented interest from all parts of the world. To date, more than 300 abstracts for conference presentations have been submitted from 45 countries, evidence of how much this subject is on the minds of researchers, advocates, activists and governmental as well as nongovernmental leaders everywhere.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Bringing Yourself to Work: Caregiving in After-School Environments

Years ago, after-school hours were a time when children played in the neighborhood, at home, or with friends. Today, they are a time when many parents scramble to find accessible, affordable, high-quality child care. As the number of after-school programs increases and the child-care field expands, various agendas are being promoted about the "appropriate" role of these programs in children's lives: academic skill development to improve performance on standardized tests, social competency skills, crime prevention, or welfare reform.

 

Wellesley Centers for Women

Relational-Cultural Research in the Real World

This past June, the Jean Baker Miller Training Institute (JBMTI) at the Wellesley Centers for Women (WCW) held Research Forum 2005, a professional development program that showcased “Relational-Cultural Research in the Real World” and provided resources for investigators who seek practical examples to inform and advance their work.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Back on the Presses: Women's Review of Books

The Wellesley Centers for Women (WCW) is proud to announce the relaunch of Women’s Review of Books! Founded by WCW in 1983, Women’s Review was published monthly for 22 years before suspending publication in December, 2004, due to rising debt. Women’s Review will return in January, 2006, as a bimonthly tabloid.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Quality Programming for Kids: Three studies identify key workforce and environment factors

The National Institute on Out-of-School Time (NIOST) at the Wellesley Centers for Women recently completed work on a comprehensive, three-year study on afterschool programs in Massachusetts, in partnership with the Intercultural Center for Research in Education (INCRE). One of the first studies of this scope nationally, the Massachusetts Afterschool Research Study (MARS) stands as a primary opportunity for researchers to examine the relationships between program characteristics and indicators of program quality, and how these relate to youth development outcomes.


Wellesley Centers for Women

Innovations in Understanding

In April, the Wellesley Centers for Women waspleased to welcome colleagues working in 46 countries across the globe to the WCW 2004 International Research and Action Conference: Innovations in Understanding Violence Against Women. Chaired by Linda Williams,Victoria Banyard, and Nada Aoudeh, this truly international meeting was designed for researchers, activists, advocates, and practitioners from the academic, nongovernmental, community-based, and government domains.

Wellesley Centers for Women

Marriage as a Bogus Cure for Poverty: Keeping low-income women safe is in our hands

Story after story of former welfare recipients who now hold jobs have created the dominant media metaphor—women formerly leading hopeless, dead-end lives are required by welfare reform to become employed and now are thrilled with their independence and new sense of self-worth. But the public is little aware of the upcoming reauthorization of the 1996 “Welfare Reform Act”—formally the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA). This Act replaced Aid to Families with Dependent Children assistance to poor and low-income women with Temporary Assistance to Needy Families.