Physician Incentives and Health Care Delivery in the U.S.

Erin Johnson, Ph.D.

Lunchtime Seminar, November 3, 2016 (48:55 min)

johnsonPhysicians face complex and often subjective treatment decisions, and they are expected to make decisions in their patients’ best interest. However, physicians are human and susceptible to biases. Erin Johnson, Ph.D. uses large administrative datasets to explore the factors that affect physician decision-making. In this presentation, she discussed findings from research on how physicians are affected by financial incentives, convenience concerns, and relationships with patients. The projects discussed cover decision-making in cardiac care and in childbirth, with a focus not only on treatments but also patient outcomes.

Erin Johnson, Ph.D. is a research scientist at the Wellesley Centers for Women (WCW) and a visiting lecturer in the economics department at Wellesley College. She is an applied microeconomist with a research focus on the economics of health care. Prior to joining WCW earlier this year, Johnson was an assistant professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

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