• Women's Review of Books
    NEWS

    Women's Review of Books: The Genuis Octavia Butler

    November/December 2017

    The new issue of Women's Review highlights the genius of Octavia Butler and looks at other books by and about women on the relationships between First Ladies and slaves in their households, the history of the U.S. gay and lesbian left, and the women2drive campaign that challenged Saudi Arabia's prohibition on women driving.

    Browse the issue>>
  • Lunchtime Seminar Videos
    VIDEO

    Watch Footage from Thought-Provoking Lecture Series

    This fall, scholars and friends of WCW presented new findings and shared their work during our Lunchtime Seminar Series. Watch the recordings to learn about a science education initiative, imposter syndrome, a new novel, and civic engagement.

    Watch Videos>>
  • The Journey of a Women’s Health Activist: A Personal Story
    AUDIO

    The Journey of a Women’s Health Activist: A Personal Story

    October/November 2017

    Listen to Byllye Y. Avery, Founder of the Black Women's Health Imperative, share the personal story of how she came to be a health activist.

    Listen>>
The Wellesley Centers for Women is a premier women- and gender-focused, social-change oriented research-and-action institute at Wellesley College.
Our mission is to advance gender equality, social justice, and human wellbeing through high quality research, theory, and action programs.

PROJECTS

Give

A World That Is Good for Women Is Good for Everyone TM

GO TO GIVE

 Research & Action Report Fall/Winter 2003 

international work  In May, Linda Williams made her third trip to South Africa to participate in and present two papers at the Second South African Gender-Based Violence and Health Conference, held in Johannesburg. This conference brought together over 200 participants—predominantly those working to stop violence against women in South Africa, but also including representatives from Eritrea, Nigeria, Uganda, Sudan, Cameroon, Canada, United Kingdom, Switzerland, and the United States. The three-day conference addressed the critical
issues of child sexual abuse, HIV/AIDS and gender based violence, and domestic violence and health issues.

international work  In May, Linda Williams made her third trip to South Africa to participate in and present two papers at the Second South African Gender-Based Violence and Health Conference, held in Johannesburg. This conference brought together over 200 participants—predominantly those working to stop violence against women in South Africa, but also including representatives from Eritrea, Nigeria, Uganda, Sudan, Cameroon, Canada, United Kingdom, Switzerland, and the United States. The three-day conference addressed the critical

issues of child sexual abuse, HIV/AIDS and gender based violence, and domestic violence and health issues.

 

Williams presented “Women’s lives and women’s voices: Pathways to recovery by survivors of child sexual abuse,” coauthored with Victoria L. Banyard. This presentation focused on women’s strength and resilience and on understanding women’s resistance to the negative consequences of violence in childhood. Williams reported new findings from in-depth interviews with African- American women of lower socioeconomic status in the U.S. These women have negotiated pathways to survival and found ways to function adaptively despite numerous childhood stressors. Through qualitative analyses, Williams and Banyard were able to identify strategies for survival.

 

“Liberating methodologies for understanding and transforming violence against women,” coauthored with Nadera Shalhoub Kevorkian
of Hebrew University, Jerusalem, explored the link between research on violence against women and activism. The authors used case studies of violence against women in oppressive sociopolitical contexts to demonstrate the connections between feminist research, women’s experiences, activism, and liberation. Kevorkian and Williams discussed how the politico-gender context and social consciousness influence violence against women, impact researchers, affect our understanding of abuse, and raise questions about methodologies.

 

The conference forged important connections for future international work in preventing violence against women. Many attendees indicated
their strong interest in participating in the WCW conference planned for April 2004.