The C.A.R.E. Program: Integrating Science into the Art of Therapy

Amy Banks, M.D.

Lunchtime Seminar May 19, 2016 (54:06 min)

BanksPresentation2There has been a long history of disconnection between the art of psychodynamic therapy work and the information being discovered in neuroscience research labs all around the world. This interactive lecture introduced attendees to the C.A.R.E. Program, a novel approach to healing mind, body, and relationships that integrates action and science to help people use their brains in building stronger, more rewarding relationships and healthier lives.

Amy Banks, M.D. is the Director of Advanced Training at the Jean Baker Miller Training Institute (JBMTI) and author of Four Ways to Click: Rewrite Your Brain for Stronger, More Rewarding Relationships. Banks was the first person to bring Relational-Cultural Theory together with neuroscience and is the foremost expert in the combined field. In addition to her work at JBMTI, she is the creator of the C.A.R.E. Program, has a private practice in Lexington, and was an instructor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School.

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WCW Lunchtime Seminar Series

  • Wellesley Centers for Women (WCW) scholars offer seminar and panel presentations during which they share their work with other scholars and the general public. The WCW Lunchtime Seminar Series, for example, offers residents and visitors to the Greater Boston area the opportunity to hear, in person, about work by WCW researchers and program staff. Other special events bring these researchers and program staff into communities for special presentations to the Centers' many constituents.

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