In the developing world, one-third of girls are married before the age of 18, according to the International Center for Research on Women. During this May 2018 Lunchtime Seminar Series presentation, Rangita de Silva de Alwis, S.J.D.,  discussed how advocates from across the globe are trying to change laws to prevent child marriage. 

A rash of legislation combating child marriage, and pledges by political leaders—including those of Sheikh Hasina, the prime minister of Bangladesh, and Joyce Banda, the former president of Malawi— to fight child marriage in their countries, reveal loopholes in the laws that roll back the promise of law reform. In this presentation, Dr. de Silva de Alwis considered recent legal revisions in Bangladesh and Zimbabwe, along with comparative perspectives of Malawi and other countries, to determine the promises and potential pitfalls of such reforms.

 

© Copyright 2018 Wellesley Centers for Women, Wellesley College. This video cannot be posted elsewhere without the explicit written permission of the Wellesley Centers for Women.

May 4, 2018

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