Year Published: 2015

Author: Sasha Stavsky,.M.A.

Over the past decade, growing evidence has pointed to the unique and positive role out of-school time (OST) programs can play in the lives of young people. Durlak and Weissburg's 2007 examination of the impact of youth development programs on personal and social skills has suggested that participation in OST programs is associated with youth's feelings of self-confidence and self-esteem, positive feelings and attitudes towards school, positive social behaviors, and reduced problem behaviors such as aggression and noncompliance. With this increased recognition has come increased resources for OST programs; with increased resources has come higher expectations for results. A recent report from Grantmakers for Education indicates that the four most common outcomes grantmakers seek for youth through their grants to OST programs are (1) improved academic achievement, (2) increased student engagement, (3) positive youth development, and (4) 21st century skill building.

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