Author: Alexandra G. Kaplan

Dichotomous and nondichotomous thought represent two distinct modes of understanding that reflect dualistic, hierarchical, one-way processes or multiple, complex, and interwoven processes, respectively. This paper explores the implications of this distinction for the structure of human relationships and the study of psychology, developmental theory, and, especially, clinical theory and practice.

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