Year Published: 2018
Authors: LaShawnda Lindsay-Dennis, Ph.D., Linda M. Williams, Ph.D., & Judith Jackson-Pomeroy
Source: Rejoinder Journal

Founded in 2006, the “Me Too” movement was ignited to support survivors of sexual violence, particularly Black women and girls, and other young women of color from economically marginalized communities. This movement supports survivors by helping them to find pathways to healing. Empirical data documents the numerous challenges that Black girls and young women face growing up in distressed neighborhoods in the context of intersecting socio-political obstacles. These include macro and micro level phenomena such as racism, sexism, economic deprivation, educational inequalities, and community, interpersonal and familial violence including immediate threats to their physical safety. In this paper, the authors seek to identify specific social and cultural factors that shape how Black girls and women cope with sexual violence and explore how these factors may influence their pathways to healing. They also discuss how social media hashtags such as #metoo affect advocacy and awareness of the nuances of Black female survivors’ lives.

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