Kate Price, M.A.: Longing to Belong: Relational Risks and Resilience in U.S. Prostituted Children
Lunchtime Seminar March 15, 2012 (50:52 min.)

Prostituted children are vulnerable to exploitation through the lack of secure relationships and histories of betrayal. Furthermore, the very assumption that children will be protected is fundamental to our proprietary, private family-based (white, heterosexual) culture. And yet, prostituted children, like all people, require nurturing relationships and belonging. Providing relationship-building and conflict resolution skills, within the framework of prostituted children's relational challenges such as Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and betrayal histories, provides hope and agency in a culture that is ready to disregard and incriminate children who do not fit in the innocence mold. Kate Price, M.A., is Program Associate at the Jean Baker Miller Training Institute.

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WCW Lunchtime Seminar Series

  • Wellesley Centers for Women (WCW) scholars offer seminar and panel presentations during which they share their work with other scholars and the general public. The WCW Lunchtime Seminar Series, for example, offers residents and visitors to the Greater Boston area the opportunity to hear, in person, about work by WCW researchers and program staff. Other special events bring these researchers and program staff into communities for special presentations to the Centers' many constituents.

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  • Please note that data and background information cited in these presentations were current for the date of the presentation but should not necessarily be considered the most current research on the related issues today.

  • The Wellesley Centers for Women Lunchtime Seminar Series is made possible by support from The Cowles/Sulzberger Fund, an endowed gift to the Wellesley Centers for Women.