Publications

The Wellesley Centers for Women (WCW) offers free downloads, selected from our many publications, to our website visitors. We hope that by reading WCW publications, you will gain an understanding of the complexity, depth, and importance of the work undertaken by the researchers and program staff at WCW.

Browse publications:

Understanding and Responding to the Mental Health Needs of Latino Youth in a Cultural Framework

Year Published: 2015

Authors: Lisa Fortuna, Aida Jimenez, Michelle Porche

Source: Cultural Sensitivity in Children and Adolescent Mental Health

 

Changing Policy to Achieve Equity for Infants and Toddlers

Year Published: 2015

Authors: M.V. Mayoral, Pedro Noguera, Aisha Ray, Layli Maparyan, Lauren Hogan

Source: Zero to Three

 

Distal and Proximal Religiosity as Protective Factors for Adolescent and Emerging Adult Alcohol Use

Year Published: 2015

Authors: Michelle V. Porche, Lisa R. Fortuna, Amy Wachholtz, and Rosalie Torres Stone

Source: Religions

 

An internet-based adolescent depression preventive intervention: study protocol for a randomized control trial

Year Published: 2015

Authors: Tracy G Gladstone, Monika Marko-Holguin, Phyllis Rothberg, Jennifer Nidetz, Anne Diehl, Daniela T DeFrino, Mary Harris, Eumene Ching, Milton Eder, Jason Canel, Carl Bell, William R Beardslee, C Hendricks Brown, Kathleen Griffiths and Benjamin W Van Voorhees

Source: Trials Journal

 

Comparing Sexuality Communication Among Offspring of Teen Parents and Adult Parents: a Different Role for Extended Family

Year Published: 2015

Authors: Jennifer M. Grossman, Allison J. Tracy, Amanda M. Richer, Sumru Erkut

Source: Sexuality Research and Social Policy

 

Extending the Knapsack: Using the White Privilege Analysis to Examine Conferred Advantage and Disadvantage

Year Published: 2015

Authors: Peggy McIntosh

Source: Women in Therapy

 

Practices and Approaches of Out-of-School Time Programs Serving Immigrant and Refugee Youth

Year Published: 2015

Authors: Georgia Hall, Michelle Porche, Jennifer Grossman, and Sviatlana Smashnaya

Source: Journal of Youth Development

 

Post-Secondary Education and Information on Labor Market Prospects: A Randomized Field Experiment

Year Published: 2015

Authors: Sari Pekkala Kerr, Tuomas Pekkarinen, Matti Sarvimaki, Roope Uusitalo

Source: Post-Secondary Education and Information on Labor Market Prospects: A Randomized Field Experiment

 

Increasing Understanding in Children of Depressed Parents: Predictors and Moderators of Intervention Response

Year Published: 2015

Authors: Tracy R. G. Gladstone, Peter W. Forbes, Anne Diehl, and William R. Beardslee

Source: Depression Research and Treatment

 

Development of a technology-based behavioral vaccine to prevent adolescent depression: A health system integration model

Year Published: 2015

Authors: Benjamin W. Van Voorhees, Tracy Gladstone, Stephanie Cordel, Monika Marko-Holguin, William Beardslee, Sachiko Kuwabara, Mark Allan Kaplan, Joshua Fogel, Anne Diehl, Chris Hansen, Carl Bell

Source: Internet Intervention

 

Effect of a Cognitive-Behavioral Prevention Program on Depression 6 Years After Implementation Among At-Risk Adolescents A Randomized Clinical Trial

Year Published: 2015

Authors: David A. Brent, MD; Steven M. Brunwasser, PhD; Steven D. Hollon, PhD; V. Robin Weersing, PhD; Gregory N. Clarke, PhD; John F. Dickerson, PhD; William R. Beardslee, MD; Tracy R. G. Gladstone, PhD; Giovanna Porta, MS; Frances L. Lynch, PhD; Satish Iyengar, PhD; Judy Garber, PhD

Source: JAMA Psychiatry

 

Prevention of Depression in At-Risk Adolescents: Predictors and Moderators of Acute Effects

Year Published: 2016

Author: Weersing, V.R., Shamseddeen, W., Garber, J., Hollon, S.D., Clarke, G.N., Beardslee, W.R., Gladstone, T.R., Lynch, F.L., Porta, G., Iyengar, S. and Brent, D.A.

Source:  "Prevention of Depression in At-Risk Adolescents: Predictors and Moderators of Acute Effects", Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Volume 55, Issue 3.

 

Obscuring Gender-Based Violence: Marriage Promotion and Teen Dating Violence Research

Year Published: 2016

Author: Carrie Baker & Nan Stein

Source: "Obscuring Gender-Based Violence:Marriage Promotion and Teen Dating Violence Research", Journal of Women, Politics & Policy, 37:1, 87-109, DOI: 10.1080/1554477X.2016.1116301

ISSN: 1554-4788 (Online)

 

Bringing Yourself to Work: A Guide to Successful Staff Development in After-School Programs

Authors: Michelle Seligson, Ed.M. and Patricia Jahoda Stahl, Ed.M.

ISBN: 0807744263

Planning in Middle Childhood: Early Predictors and Later Outcomes

Year Published: 2014

Authors: Friedman, S.L., Scholnick, E.K., Bender, R.H., Vandergrift, N., Spieker, S., Hirsh Pasek, K., Keating, D.P., Park, Y. and the NICHD Early Child Care Research Network*
* Marshall is a member of the NICHD ECCRN

Source: Child Development, July 2014, Vol. 85 Issue 4, p. 1446-1460

Abstract: Data from 1,364 children and families who participated in the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development's Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development were analyzed to track the early correlates and later academic outcomes of planning during middle childhood. Maternal education, through its effect on parenting quality when children were 54 months old, predicts their concurrent performance on sustained attention, inhibition, and short-term verbal memory tests. This performance predicts planning in first grade, which predicts third-grade reading and mathematics attainment, but not the rate of growth in academic skills from first to fifth grades. This path was also found when the same parenting, cognitive, and academic constructs were measured at later time points.

ISSN: 0009-3920

DOI: 10.1111/cdev.12221

Employment and Women's Health

Year Published: 2013

Author: Marshall, N.L.

Source: In M.V. Spiers, P.A. Geller & J.D. Kloss (Eds.), Women's Health Psychology (46-63),  Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons

ISSN: 978-0-470-89066-0

 

Subsidized child care, maternal employment and access to quality, affordable child care

Year Published: 2013

Author: Marshall, N.L., Robeson, W.W., Tracy, A.J., Frye, A., & Roberts, J.

Source: Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 28, 808–819.

Abstract: To examine whether state child care subsidy policies can combine goals of increasing maternal employment and increasing access to quality child care for children in low-income families, we studied one state's comprehensive policy, through a cross-sectional survey of 665 randomly selected families using centers, Head Starts, family child care homes, public school preschools or informal care, including a sample of families on the waitlist for child care subsidies. We found that, in Massachusetts, families receiving child care subsidies report greater access to child care, more affordable child care, and higher quality child care, than do similar families not receiving subsidies. Lower-income families not receiving subsidies can sometimes access affordable, quality child care through Head Start programs and public preschools, but, when they have to pay for care, they pay a significantly greater proportion of their income than do families receiving subsidies. We also found that families on the subsidy waitlist are at a particular disadvantage. Waitlist families have the greatest difficulty paying for care, the least access, and the poorest quality child care. While the child care subsidy policies benefited those families receiving subsidies, families outside the system still struggled to find and afford child care.

ISSN: 0885-2006

 

Boston Quality Inventory 2013: Community Early Care and Education Programs

Year Published: 2013

Author: Marshall, N.L., Robeson, W.W., & Roberts, J.

Source: Wellesley Centers for Women, Wellesley College, Wellesley, MA, available at: Boston EQUIP

 

Strengthening At Risk and Homeless Young Mothers and Children: Cross-Site Evaluation of the Strengthening At Risk and Homeless Young Mothers and Children Initiative 2012

Year Published: 2012

Author: The National Center on Family Homelessness, with Marshall, N.L.

Source: The National Center on Family Homelessness, available at: American Institutes for Research

 

Program Facility Standards for Early Care and Education & Out-of-School-Time Programs

Year Published: 2011

Author: Pardee, M., Cowden, M.M., Robeson, W.W., Marshall, N.L., Hall, G., Tomasetti, S. & Hutchinson, B.

Source: The Children’s Investment Fund

 

Facilities Inventory Project: Data Report

Year Published: 2011

Author: Marshall, N.L., Robeson, W.W., Hall, G., Tomasetti, S & Hutchinson, B., Tomasetti, S. & Hutchinson, B.

Source: Wellesley Centers for Women & On-Site Insight. Report to The Children’s Investment Fund

 

Facilities Inventory Project: Boston Report

Year Published: 2011

Author: Marshall, N.L., Robeson, W.W., Hall, G., Tomasetti, S & Hutchinson, B.

Source: Wellesley Centers for Women & On-Site Insight. Report to The Children’s Investment Fund

 

Building an Infrastructure for Quality: An Inventory of Early Childhood Education and Out-of-School Time Facilities in Massachusetts

Year Published: 2011

Author: Children's Investment Fund

Source: Wellesley Centers for Women & On-Site Insight. Report to The Children’s Investment Fund, available at: Wellesley Centers for Women

 

Boston Quality Inventory 2010: Community Early Care and Education Programs.

Year Published: 2010

Author: Marshall, N.L., Dennehy, J., Robeson, W.W. & Roberts, J.

Source: Wellesley Centers for Women, Wellesley College, Wellesley, MA.

 

School Tracking and Development of Cognitive Skills

Year Published: 2013

Authors: Kerr S., Pekkarinen T., and Uusitalo R.

Source: Journal of Labor Economics, Vol. 31 (no. 3)

Abstract: We evaluate the effects of the school system on mathematical, verbal, and logical reasoning skills using data from the Finnish comprehensive school reform that abolished the two-track school system. We use a difference-in-differences approach that exploits the gradual implementation across the country. Cognitive skills are measured using test scores from the Finnish Army Basic Skills Test. The reform had small positive effects on verbal test scores but no effect on the mean performance in the arithmetic or logical reasoning tests. However, the reform significantly improved the scores of the students whose parents had less than a high school education.

DOI: 10.1086/669493

Immigration and Employer Transitions for STEM Workers

Year Published: 2013

Authors: Pekkala Kerr S., Kerr W.

Source: American Economic Review, Vol. 103, 2013

Abstract: The firm is almost entirely absent from models of immigration, and yet firms play a central role for high-skilled immigration. The H-1B visa program, for example, is a firm-sponsored entry where firms are responsible for every stage: from identifying the immigrant, to employing them, to filing for permanent residency on behalf of the immigrant. This central role of firms for high-skilled immigration suggests the traditional lens for evaluating the impact of immigration on natives through local area labor markets or national age-education approaches may miss important dynamics. We analyze the employment and wage trajectories of high-skilled workers born in America when a high-skilled immigrant arrives at their work site. We use linked employer-employee data during the 1995-2008 period from the Census Bureau for this exercise, which identifies the immigration status and country-of-birth of workers. We follow the subsequent career path of workers after high-skilled immigration occurs to the employee's work site both within firms (e.g., changes in employee salary, relocation to other sites) and across firms (e.g., movements to new jobs or out of workforce, long-term salary adjustments). The richness and depth of the Census Bureau data allow for multiple comparison points: selection on observables (e.g., age, tenure, salary levels and recent growth), varying immigration treatments across different work sites for the same firm for otherwise comparable employees, and (for a subset of cases and short time period at the end of our sample) randomization in H-1B admission lotteries.

DOI: 10.1257/aer.103.3.193

Intergenerational Income Immobility in Finland: Contrasting Roles for Parental Earnings and Family Income

Year Published: 2012

Authors: Lucas R.E.B and Pekkala Kerr S.

Source: Journal of Population Economics, Vol. 25, 2012

Abstract: An intergenerational model is developed, nesting heritable earning abilities and credit constraints limiting human capital investments in children. Estimates on a large, Finnish data panel indicate very low transmission from parental earnings, suggesting that the parameter of inherited earning ability is tiny. Family income, particularly during the phase of educating children, is shown to be much more important in shaping children’s lifetime earnings. This influence of parental incomes on children’s earnings rises as the children age because the returns to education rise. Despite Finland’s well-developed welfare state, persistence in economic status across generations is much higher than previously thought.

DOI: 10.1007/s00148-012-0442-8

Economic Impacts of Immigration: A Survey

Year Published: 2011

Authors: Kerr W. and Pekkala Kerr S.

Source: Finnish Economic Papers, Vol. 24, 2011

Abstract: An intergenerational model is developed, nesting heritable earning abilities and credit constraints limiting human capital investments in children. Estimates on a large, Finnish data panel indicate very low transmission from parental earnings, suggesting that the parameter of inherited earning ability is tiny. Family income, particularly during the phase of educating children, is shown to be much more important in shaping children’s lifetime earnings. This influence of parental incomes on children’s earnings rises as the children age because the returns to education rise. Despite Finland’s well-developed welfare state, persistence in economic status across generations is much higher than previously thought.

DOI: 10.3386/w16736

Building Professional Development for Urban Public Preschools: Experiences and Reflections.

Year Published: 2011

Authors: Roberts, J.R. & Love, M.L.

Source: The Early Childhood Educator Professional Development Grant Research and Practice (Advances in Early Education and Day Care). John A. Sutterby (Ed.) Bingley, UK: Emerald.

ISBN: 0857242806

Development of Healthy Eating and Physical Activity Quality Standards for Out-of-School Time Programs

Year Published: 2012

Authors: Wiecha, J.L., Hall, G., Gannett, E., Roth, B.

Source: Childhood Obesity, Vol 8, Number 6.

DOI: 10.1089/chi.2012.0030.

Preventive interventions for children of parents with depression: International perspectives

Year Published: 2012

Authors: Beardslee, W.R., Solantaus, T., Morgan, B., Gladstone, T., & Kowalenko, N.

Source: Medical Journal of Australia

Developmental risk of depression: Experience matters

Year Published: 2012

Authors: Beardslee, W.R., Gladstone, T.R.G., & O’Connor, E.E.

Source: Psychiatric Clinics of North America

DOI: 10.1016/j.chc.2011.12.001

Health prevention and promotion

Authors: Beardslee, W.R., & Gladstone, T.R.G.

Source: In R.C. Talley, G.L. Fricchione, B.G. Druss, & R. Martinez (Eds.), Caregiving and mental health. New York: Oxford University Press.

Constructing Profiles of Religious Agreement and Disagreement Between Adolescents and Mothers: A Research Note

Year Published: 2012

Authors: Noonan, A.E., Tracy, A.J., & Grossman, J.

Source: Review of Religious Research

Abstract: This research note describes the use of latent class analysis to examine how three dimensions of religiosity—the importance of religion (religious salience), attendance at religious services, and frequency of prayer—cluster together to form unique profiles. Building upon recent research identifying different profiles of religiosity at the level of the individual, we used data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health to identify dyadic profiles of religious concordance or discordance between 14,202 adolescents and their mothers. We identified five profiles: one concordant (27% of sample), two discordant (25% of sample), and two of mixed concordance/discordance (49%). The profiles distinguish between various levels of adolescent/mother relations, suggesting that they may represent distinct family dynamics. They also distinguish between several variables (race, adolescent age, geographical region) in predictable ways, providing additional demonstration of the categories’ meaningfulness.

ISSN: 2211-4866 (online) / 0034-673X (print)

DOI: 10.1007/s13644-012-0053-6

Stages of Change and the Group Treatment of Batterers: A Randomized Clinical Trial

Year Published: 2010

Authors: Alexander, P.C., Morris, E., Tracy, A., & Frye, A.

Source: Violence and Victims, 25(5), 571-587.

Abstract: A stages-of-change motivational interviewing (SOCMI) treatment approach was compared with a standard cognitive behavioral therapy gender reeducation (CBTGR) approach in a sample of 528 English-speaking and Spanish-speaking male batterers who were randomly assigned to 49 26-week groups in either condition. Blind ratings of therapist adherence differentiated the two conditions. Language spoken neither predicted outcome nor interacted with treatment. The SOCMI curriculum led to significant reductions in female partners' reports of physical aggression at follow-up, but not to changes in self-reported aggression. Men who were initially less ready to change benefited more from the SOCMI approach while men who were more ready to change benefited more from the CBTGR approach. Results suggest the importance of tailoring abuser intervention programs to individuals' initial readiness to change.

DOI: 10.1891/0886-6708.25.5.571

The Relational Health Indices for Youth: An Examination of Reliability and Validity Aspects

Year Published: 2010

Authors: Liang, B., Tracy, A.J., Kenny, M.E., Brogan, D., Gatha, R.

Source: Measurement and Evaluation in Counseling and Development, 42(2)

Abstract: Relational health, a termed coined by Liang et al. (2001) to reflect Relational-Cultural Theory concepts, is the presence of growth-fostering characteristics in significant relationships. Although growth-fostering relationships have been conceptualized as relevant across the lifespan, existing research has mainly explored the experiences of college students and adults. In this study, the authors seek to create a developmentally appropriate instrument called the Relational Health Indices for Youth (RHI-Y) for studying growth-fostering relationships among early and mid-adolescents. This measure adapts the original adult RHI instrument for a younger population (i.e., utilizing a simpler vocabulary and containing fewer items). Measurement development resulted in six-item scales assessing relational health in three different relationship domains: friendships, relationships with an adult mentor, and relationships with members of a community group. Results indicate that the RHI-Y scales are valid, reliable measures of growth-fostering relationships. Preliminary findings about the correlates of relational health in youth are discussed.

DOI: 10.1177/0748175609354596

Measurement Uncertainty in Racial and Ethnic Identification Among Adolescents of Mixed Ancestry: A Latent Variable Approach

Year Published: 2010

Authors: Tracy, A.J., Erkut, S., Porche, M.V., Kim, J., Charmaraman, L., Grossman, J.M., Ceder, I., & Vázquez Garcia, H.

Source: Structural Equation Modeling, 17(1), 11-133. NIHMSID 277208

Abstract: In this article, we operationalize identification of mixed racial and ethnic ancestry among adolescents as a latent variable to (a) account for measurement uncertainty, and (b) compare alternative wording formats for racial and ethnic self-categorization in surveys. Two latent variable models were fit to multiple mixed-ancestry indicator data from 1,738 adolescents in New England. The first, a mixture factor model, accounts for the zero-inflated mixture distribution underlying mixed-ancestry identification. Alternatively, a latent class model allows classification distinction between relatively ambiguous versus unambiguous mixed-ancestry responses. Comparison of individual indicators reveals that the Census 2000 survey version estimates higher prevalence of mixed ancestry but is less sensitive to relative certainty of identification than are alternate survey versions (i.e., offering a “mixed” check box option, allowing a written response). Ease of coding and missing data are also considered in discussing the relative merit of individual mixed-ancestry indicators among adolescents.

DOI: 10.1080/10705510903439094

“I have a Tumblr, which is sort of feminist- y, social justice-y”: Women of color cultivating virtual social capital to survive and thrive.

womenofcolorandsocialmediaAuthors: Charmaraman, L., Chan, B., Price, T., & Richer, A.

Source: Manuscript accepted for forthcoming edited book, entitled Women of color and social media multitasking: Blogs, timelines, feeds, and community.

Do as I say, not as I did: How parents talk with teens about sex

Year: 2012

Authors: Grossman, J., Charmaraman, L., & Erkut, S.

Source: Journal of Family Issues

Abstract: Communication between parents and teens about sexuality can reduce early sexual behavior. However, little research investigates how parents who were adolescents when they had children (early parents) talk with their teens about sex. In-depth interviews were conducted with a racially/ethnically diverse sample of 29 parents of seventh graders. Salient themes of conversations with adolescents were risks of early parenthood, sexually transmitted infections, delaying sex, and using protection. Compared with parents who were older when they had children (later parents), early parents were more likely to report having had negative sexuality communications with their families of origin and to express a wish to communicate differently with their own children. Early parents were more likely than later parents to discuss risks of early parenthood and to rely on extended family involvement in sexuality communication. Findings suggest that early parents may bring unique perspectives that enable them to approach sexuality communication differently than do later parents.

DOI: 10.1177/0192513X13511955

Protective Effects of Middle School Comprehensive Sex Education With Family Involvement

Year: 2014

Authors: Grossman, J., Tracy, A., Charmaraman, L., & Erkut, S.

Source: Journal of School Health, 84, 739-747

Abstract: School-based comprehensive sex education programs can reduce early adolescents' risky sexual behavior. The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a 3-year comprehensive sex education program in delaying vaginal sex for middle school students and whether the family component of the intervention contributes to its effectiveness.METHODS This longitudinal evaluation followed a cohort of 6th graders (N = 2453) through the end of 8th grade. The design used random assignment of 24 schools into treatment and comparison conditions. The analysis included multiple-group logistic regression to assess differences in delay of sex between intervention and comparison groups.RESULTSIn schools where the program was taught, 16% fewer boys and 15% fewer girls had had sex by the end of 8th grade compared to boys and girls at comparison schools. Completing family activities during the first year of the program predicted delayed sexual debut for boys.CONCLUSIONS Theory-based, developmentally appropriate, comprehensive sex education programs that include parent involvement can be effective in delaying vaginal sex for middle school students. Parent involvement is particularly important for boys, as family activities may encourage parents to talk with their sons earlier and more frequently.

DOI: 10.1111/josh.12199

Be Careful Who You Friend: Early Adolescents' Reports of Safety, Privacy, and Family Monitoring of Facebook Use

Year: 2014

Authors: Charmaraman, L., & Grossman, J.

Source: Journal of Youth Development: Bridging research and practice, 9(1), 86-112

Family Homework and School-Based Sex Education: Delaying Early Adolescents' Sexual Behavior

Year: 2013

Authors: Grossman, J. M., Frye, A., Charmaraman, L., & Erkut, S.

Source: Journal of School Health, 83(11), 810-817

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