Lunchtime Seminar: Using Teachers' Memories of School to Reframe Their Teaching Methods and Relate Better to the Most Vulnerable Students

 

The Wellesley Centers for Women (WCW) continues its fall lunchtime seminar series October 20th with “Using Teachers' Memories of School to Reframe Their Teaching Methods and Relate Better to the Most Vulnerable Students,” presented by Peggy McIntosh, Ph.D., WCW associate director. Teachers are not neutral transmitters of skills and information. All were wounded by their schooling, but have been encouraged to forget this because they "did well" and now make a living in education. The National SEED Project on Inclusive Curriculum (Seeking Educational Equity and Diversity) helps teachers to recover their memories of suffering in school, in order to transform their ability to teach more effectively and empathetically all students, but especially the most vulnerable students in their care. Peggy McIntosh, WCW associate director and founder of The SEED Project, will lead this interactive discussion.

Lunchtime seminars are held Thursdays, 12:30-1:30 p.m. at the Centers' Cheever House location, 828 Washington Street, Wellesley. The programs are free and open to the public. Bring your lunch, WCW will provide tea and coffee. To confirm program line-up, call 781 283 2500 or visit www.wcwonline.org/calendar.

The Wellesley Centers for Women is one of the largest gender-focused research-and-action organizations in the world. Scholars at the Centers conduct social science research and evaluation, develop theory and publications, and implement training programs on issues that put women’s lives and women’s concerns at the center. Since 1974, our work has generated changes in attitudes, practices, and public policy.